NATIONAL COLLECTION X MUSEUM MARTKET AUSPICIOUS RED PACKETS PACK OF 8

Rp 736.000,00 IDR

Design of reversible red packets inspired by:

SARONG, OEY KOK SING

(NEE KHO T JING NIO,1896-1966)

Java, Pekalongan, 1940

Cotton (drawn batik), synthetic dyes

Collection of Peranakan Museum 

2017-00341

Gift of Ika, Meila, and Inge Hendromartono in memory of their parents Liem Siok Hien and Jane Hendromartono, grandmother Mrs Oey Kok Sing, and great grandmother Mrs Oey Soen King

Oey Kok Sing was the daughter of Oey Soen King. She embraced the use of synthetic dyes, which were available in Java by late 19th Century.

DRAGON ROBE

China, Qing dynasty

(Kangxi period, 1662-1722)

Robes

Collection of Asian Civilisations Museum

2009-02961

This imperial dragon robe features nine dragons amid stylised clouds, with motifs of waves and mountains at the hem. The dragons are five-clawed, a type reserved for the emperor and his imeediate family. The robe is a jifu, which was worn at court for semi-formal occasions during the Manchi-led Qing dynasty (1644-1911)

KANTHA EMBROIDERY WITH FLORAL MOTIFS

West Bendal, India 20th Century Embroidery

Collection of Indian Heritage Centre

2013-00525

Kantha is a form of quilted embroidery skillfully crafted by the women of Bengal,India. These artisans create a range of items, including bedspreads, wraps and book or mirrow covers, intended for domestic use or as thoughtful gifts. Kantha pieces draw inspiration form a diverse array of influences, encompassing rural scenes city life, modernization, mytho-logical narratives, and the incorporation of floral and vine motifs. Utilizing recycled cloth and yarn sourced from old saris, these intricate works exemplify a harmonious blend of tradition and sustainability. In this example, large floral motifs placed within squares from a repetitive pattern.

TELIA RUMAL SARI

Andhra Pradesh, South India, 20th century

Textile

Collection of Indian Heritage Centre

2013-00564

Featuring a recurring stepped square pattern, this is a double ikat Telia Rumal sari. Also known as the "Asia Rumal " , the Telia Rumal represents an ikat style primarily crafted for local use and trade within the Andhra region of South India . The art of ikat, a technique wherein both wrap and weft threads are tie-dyed to create predetermined patterns when woven, found extensive practise in India. The city of Masulipatnam, recognised as a pivotal center for trade and textile production, gained prominence for the Telia Rumal - a versatile cloth serving various purpose like a loin cloth, lungi , turban, or draped as a sari.

LONG ROBE

Malacca, early mid-20th century

Silk, metal thread

Collection of Peranakan Museum

2011-01803

This turquoise damask silk robe is richly embroidered with auspicious symbols in silk and gold thread couching on the bottom half. It features the crane at the sides which symbolises both status and longevity. This robe would have been worn by the groom.

SARONG

Java, 1930s-60s

Textile

Collection of Asian Civilisation Museum

2007-00208

Gift of Anne Soh Gwek Shin

This sarong would have been worn by a nyonya (Peranakan woman) under a kebaya. It features a large floral bouquet in the dark green central panel and a lattice design on the rest of the body. The design structure a wide central panel framed by narrower borders is distinct to batik sarongs worn by the Chinese and European communities in Singapore. Nyonya style sarongs are know for their bright and colourful designs, made possible by chemical dyes imported from Europe in the 19th century.